First Ten Pages: American Beauty (1999)

First Ten Pages: American Beauty (1999)


Screenplay by: Alan Ball 

Kevin Spacey stars in this quirky and dark suburban drama about a man who experiences a midlife crisis after meeting his teenaged daughter's beautiful best friend. Alan Ball wrote the script and follows the 5 major rules for a screenplay in the script's first 10 pages. In fact, after just one page, Ball nails 4 of the 5 rules. Only the fifth one - the theme - needs additional pages to develop. It is a rare thing to see the first page accomplish so much. Let's see how Ball did it.

CHARACTER INTRODUCTION 

The main character is introduced using a familiar screenwriting technique - narration. But in American Beauty our main character is a ghost. In his first line, he tells us he's a dead man, which communicates the tone this film will take on the screenplay's first page.

__________________________________________ 

PAGE 1 

EXT. ROBIN HOOD TRAIL - EARLY MORNING We're FLYING above suburban America, DESCENDING SLOWLY toward a tree-lined street.

LESTER (V.O.)
My name is Lester Burnham. This is my
neighborhood. This is my street. This...
is my life. I'm forty-two years old. In
less than a year, I'll be dead. 

INT. BURNHAM HOUSE - MASTER BEDROOM - CONTINUOUS

We're looking down at a king-sized BED from OVERHEAD: LESTER BURNHAM lies sleeping amidst expensive bed linens, face down, wearing PAJAMAS. An irritating ALARM CLOCK RINGS. Lester gropes blindly to shut it off. 

LESTER (V.O.)
Of course, I don't know that yet. 

He rolls over, looks up at us and sighs. He doesn't seem too thrilled at the prospect of a new day. 

LESTER (V.O.) (CONT'D)
And in a way, I'm dead already.

__________________________________________

Notice how Ball describes the setting as we read what Lester is telling us. Flying above a suburb and coming down on a single street gives us a unique perspective. The script gives us the gift of dramatic irony in its opening paragraphs. We know things the other characters do not know. This will influence how we interpret the material we will read on subsequent pages.

__________________________________________ 

TONE/GENRE 

To set the tone of the screenplay, Ball uses another familiar screenwriting technique, though one not often used - the flash forward. An excerpt from a scene on page 75 is ripped out, stripped of context and placed at the top of page 1.

__________________________________________

PAGE 1

INT. FITTS HOUSE - RICKY'S BEDROOM - NIGHT On VIDEO: JANE BURNHAM lays in bed, wearing a tank top. She's sixteen, with dark, intense eyes.

JANE
I need a father who's a role model, not
some horny geek-boy who's gonna spray his
shorts whenever I bring a girlfriend home
from school.
(snorts)
What a lame-o. Somebody really should put
him out of his misery.

Her mind wanders for a beat.

RICKY (O.C.)
Want me to kill him for you? 

Jane looks at us and sits up.

JANE
(deadpan) Yeah, would you?

FADE TO BLACK.

__________________________________________ 

In this exchange, Ball sets the tone of the story as dark and foreboding, and dripping with irony. Underneath the veneer of a typical American suburb lies a bleak alternate universe, where a teenage girl sees her father infatuated with her friend and wants him dead. This scene also colors the scenes Ricky and Lester share together as they develop a relationship later in the screenplay. We will wonder if Ricky will be the one who will end Lester's life and if so, how will their relationship deteriote to that end. 

DRAMATIC SITUATION

In addition to establishing the tone, the screenplay's opening scene also puts the dramatic situation in motion. This film is about a man in midlife crisis, who will suffer an untimely death at the hands of another. A few questions are planted in our mind. How will he die? Who will kill him? And why? This is the film's single dramatic focal point. We are promised a riveting ending. A man will die, and someone will murder him.

WORLD OF THE STORY

The world of this story is American surbubia, a place that conjures up images of cul-de-sacs, freshly mowed lawns, and white picket fences. Ball is deliberate in his descriptions of the people who live in this suburb. He introduces them by showing them doing typical suburban things. First, Carolyn, Lester's wife...

__________________________________________ 

PAGE 2

EXT. BURNHAM HOUSE - MOMENTS LATER

CLOSE on a single, dewy AMERICAN BEAUTY ROSE. A gloved hand with CLIPPERS appears and SNIPS the flower off.

CAROLYN BURNHAM tends her rose bushes in front of the Burnham house. A very well-put together woman of forty, she wears color-coordinated gardening togs and has lots of useful and expensive tools.

Lester watches her through a WINDOW on the first floor, peeping out through the drapes. 

LESTER (V.O.)
That's my wife Carolyn. See the way the
handle on those pruning shears matches
her gardening clogs? That's not an accident.

__________________________________________

Next, Lester's homosexual neighbors, Jim and Jim...

__________________________________________ 

PAGE 2

EXT. JIMS' HOUSE – CONTINUOUS

In the fenced front yard of the house next door, a dog BARKS repeatedly. A MAN in a conservative suit (JIM #1) chastises the barking dog. 

JIM #1
Hush, Bitsy. You hush. What is wrong? 

LESTER (V.O.)
That's our next-door neighbor Jim. 

A second MAN in a conservative suit (JIM #2) comes out of the house.

LESTER (V.O.) (CONT'D)
And that's his lover, Jim.
JIM #2
(re: barking dog)
What in the world is wrong with her? She
had a walk this morning.
JIM #1
And a jerky treat. 
JIM #2
You spoil her.
(sternly)
Bitsy. No bark. Come inside. Now.

__________________________________________

Finally, Jane, Lester's daughter is surfing the internet.

Read the full article on TheScriptLab.com

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